Fossil radiometric dating

Actually, that ratio may have been quite different.For example, a worldwide flood would uproot and bury preflood forests.The samples were from a mile below the earth, which, according to inflated evolutionary years, were 1.5 billion years old.The helium still locked in the samples was studied as well as the rate at which the helium diffused from the rock.Afterward, less carbon would be available to enter the atmosphere from decaying vegetation.With less carbon-12 to dilute the carbon-14 continually forming from nitrogen in the upper atmosphere, the ratio of carbon-14 to carbon-12 in the atmosphere would increase.Outside the range of recorded history, calibration of the 14 clock is not possible.

If that ratio quadrupled, organic remains would appear 11,460 (2 x 5,730) years older, etc.Radiocarbon ages do not increase steadily with depth, as one might expect. In other words, the concentration of carbon-14 is unexpectedly low in the lower organic layers.As one moves to higher and higher layers, this concentration increases, but at a decreasing rate.When a living thing dies, its radiocarbon loss (decay) is no longer balanced by intake, so its radiocarbon steadily decreases with a half-life of 5,730 years.If we knew the amount of carbon-14 in an organism when it died, we could attempt to date the time of death.

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